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A Thought-Provoking Anthology on a Mosaic of Writing Collections

 

‘Stay Safe, Play Right: The Information Scientist’ by Virginia S. Martin

Virginia Snow Martin, after a 15-year career with the Jacksonville Public Library; an education and experience as a violinist; and also an accomplished artist; is a poet, fiction-writer, theologian, scientist, and comedienne.  She thoughtful, insightful, educated, and funny, and her writing will give reader insight into the political system in the United States today, commentary on great works of literature and non-fiction, and dialogue with Christ, God, Mary, and Socrates which throws light onto the spiritual death that many people feel today.

Virginia’s relationship with God is just.  To her, He is a Supreme Being who relates to her in thought.  Her relationship with Him is respectful, obedient, and humorous.  “Stay Safe, Play Right: The Information Scientist” is not only a compilation of 50 years of experience; it is treasure of instruction after observing and organizing written information, including books and their placement in the library, garbology, newspapers, billboards, propaganda, receipts, and consumer packaging for 15 years.

Her God is angry with the current state of affairs on the planet, and He would like the planet to change.  We have escaped pain through medical intervention around the turn of the 20th century and then sought pain in three world wars.  Virginia, through her conversations with God, defines what it means to be human in the 21st century.  Read it and start a world movement.

Author, Virginia S. Martin

Stay Safe, Play Right. There’s more to life than television.

Reviews:

Virginia Martin’s “The Information Scientist” is a thought-provoking anthology that provides a raw and fascinating glimpse into one writer’s world.

Instead of accepting easy explanations, Martin looks below the surface. She searches for truth even when that means grappling with uncomfortable ideas. In one essay she explores what it means for a society if the pursuit of happiness has become accepted as an inalienable right. In another sketch she explores the personal consequences of both financial privilege and hunger. In each of these pieces, as in the entirety of anthology, Martin questions conventional wisdom and refuses to be silenced with pat answers.

Martin’s range is remarkable, and this collection contains something for every reader, from sparkling childhood poems to earnest reflections and even an unexpected fairy tale. Her tonal shifts, from a lighthearted explanation of the Dewey Decimal System to intense dialogs with her Creator about our deeply flawed universe, showcase both Martin’s talent as a writer and her enormous curiosity. As the reader experiences the world through Martin’s eyes, it is impossible not to share her sense of wonder.

As this anthology demonstrates, Martin is a both a seeker and an explorer. Most of all, she is a passionate advocate for truth. For likeminded readers, these essays and poems will prove to be an enchanted journey.

– Katherine Flowers Puller, former co-worker from the Jacksonville Public Library in Jacksonville, Florida

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The book, “Stay Safe, Play Right: The Information Scientist,” by Virginia S. Martin is a mosaic of writings on different topics which  move from political – examining Thomas Jefferson three rights: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness – to basking in the beauty of God’s creation observing the sightings of the wonders of the outdoors – the sun, trees, flowers, birds, wood, fruits in the “The Life Cycle of a Seed Christmas Day, 2016” to the poignant fictional take on the destruction of the human race in “Time after Time” – featured in life after the ice age; to the historical insight on God and Christianity through the stories of “Jesus and Pontius Pilate”, “The Story of Esmerelda” to the introspection of “Poems from Childhood” and a memoir of the author’s life.

The writings expressed some deep introspection from the author, even in the entertaining “And Now for Some Comic Relief” sections and especially the poems (“Poetry”), which were written from memory from a book given to her by her fifth-grade teacher, were personal but largely introspective.

“Thoughts are like candle flames.
They burn brightly for a time
But may flicker and die out
Leaving long, thin, grey smoke
Vanishing in the distance.”

“Drops of dew on grass.
Any woman would be proud to wear those pearls.
The grass does…but never boasts.”

Vikki Hankins, Publisher

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